Winning family of the Fittest Family award stands outside of the Eugenics Building, 1925

The American Eugenics Society presented eugenics exhibits at state fairs throughout the USA, and provided information encouraging “high-grade” people to reproduce at a greater rate for the benefit of society. The Society even sponsored Fitter Family contests. First appearing in 1920 at the Kansas Free Fair, Fitter Family competitions, continued all the way until WWII. There were several different categories that families were judged in:… Read More »

Category: USA

A father comforts his son on his deathbed. The photo that changed the face of AIDS. 1989

This picture is widely considered the photo that changed the face of AIDS. It showed AIDS victims as humans and people with families. The biggest opponents of doing anything about AIDS, anything at all, were conservatives trumpeting family values. This picture showed that HIV has everything to do with family values and to have family values you have to value families. In November 1990 LIFE… Read More »

The atomic cloud over Nagasaki, 1945

This is believed to be the earliest photograph from the ground, 15 minutes after the plutonium bomb detonated over Nagasaki. The destruction was so incredible that there is no count on how many people died that day. The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki will forever live in the pages of history as two of the most significant turning points in modern history, initiating the… Read More »

German motorcycle courier in Eastern Front, 1942

Riding on an exposed vehicle in the Russian Winter, here a combination motorcycle, required protective clothing. This Kradfahrer wears a sentry’s fur-lined overcoat, heavy mittens, the fur-lined cap of the reversible winter suit, which is no doubt being worn beneath the overcoat, and a gas-mask for face protection. The air filter canister has been removed from the gas-mask 38. Special extra eyepiece lens were issued… Read More »

Category: WW2

Seven horses of the Queen’s Household Cavalry lie dead after the IRA detonated a nail bomb, 1982

The Hyde Park and Regent’s Park bombings were one of the worst IRA atrocities on the British mainland, killing 11 soldiers and seven horses and leaving dozens injured. The bombs were detonated just a couple of hours apart on July 20, 1982, and timed to cause maximum casualties. The military casualties were quickly removed. But long-range camera lenses captured, in dreadful detail, the aftermath with… Read More »

Giraffe women visit London, 1935

The Kayan Lahwi people, also known as Padaung, are an ethnic group with populations in Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand. Padaung women are well-known for wearing neck rings, brass coils that are placed around the neck, appearing to lengthen it. The women wearing these coils are known as “giraffe women.” This set of photographs is taken in 1935 when a group of Padaung women visited London.… Read More »

The assassination of Anwar Sadat, 1981

The assassins’ bullets ended the life of a man who earned a reputation for making bold decisions in foreign affairs, a reputation based in large part on his decision in 1977 to journey to the camp of Egypt’s foe, Israel, to make peace. President Sadat was the first Arab leader to recognise the state of Israel since its creation in 1948. In September 1978, he… Read More »

The London milkman, 1940

The appearance of German bombers in the skies over London introduced a new weapon of terror and destruction in the arsenal of twentieth century warfare. This concentrated direct bombing of industrial targets and civilian centers began on 7 September 1940, with heavy raids on London. It was the beginning of the Blitz – a period of intense bombing of London and other cities in Great… Read More »

Worker and supervisor at a car factory, Moscow, 1954

The distance between the two of them is too close. The worker has his hands not hanging loose, but slightly raised as though preparing to make a move. Meanwhile, the supervisor has that one hand at the collar of her dress like she’s trying to slightly spread it more and draw attention to her chest. The scene just screams sexual tension. Or, since it’s a… Read More »

An airgunner stands before his B-24 bomber wearing what it took to survive at 25,000ft altitude, 1944

The airgunner on the picture is Major David G. Bellemere and behind him is the B-24 Liberator heavy bomber ‘Tepee Time Gal’. He’s wearing the typical flight clothing: M4 flak helmet with Polaroid B-8 goggles, flak jacket, F-2 electrical flying suit with B-3 jacket, A-14 oxygen mask, the gloves and ugg airmen boots. Swastikas inscribed on the plane’s body represent number of German planes shot… Read More »

Category: WW2

Guardian Angels on the NYC subway, 1980

Guardian Angels first made an appearance on the New York subway in 1979 in an attempt to quell rising levels of violence. As in all of New York, crime was rampant in the subway in the 1970s. Thefts, robberies, shootings and killings became more frequent. The subway cars were very often graffiti-painted or vandalism-damaged both inside and outside. As the New York City Police Department… Read More »

Category: USA

A woman hitting a neo-Nazi with her handbag, 1985

A woman Hitting a neo-Nazi with her handbag is a famous photograph taken in Växjö, Sweden on 13 April 1985 by Hans Runesson. It depicts a 38-year-old woman hitting a marching Nazi-skinhead with a handbag. The photograph was taken during a demonstration of the Nordic Reich Party supporters. The angle of the photo, her posture, facial expression, and what she’s wearing makes her look a… Read More »

Ticket to Armistice – Japanese leaflet dropped on Allied troops, 1942

During World War II there were many different forms of propaganda to support the war effort in Japan. Sometimes the Japanese used sexual images in order to influence Allied soldiers to pick up surrender leaflets. The leaflet above depicts a bare-breasted female in an inviting pose. The bearer of the present ticket is considered as “willing to surrender to the Japanese army”. The Japanese army… Read More »

Native American smoke curing a human corpse, 1910

Among the Kwakwaka’wakw people of the Pacific Northwest, the Hamatsa were a secret society. This society exercised a ritual often called a “cannibal” ritual, and some debate has arisen as to whether the Kwakwaka’wakw do or do not practice ritual cannibalism, whether their “cannibalism” is purely symbolic, or literal. The Hamatsa initiate, almost always a young man at approximately age 25, is abducted by members… Read More »

Vladimir Lenin’s last photo. He had had three strokes at this point and was completely mute, 1923

This last photo shows Lenin in a wheelchair after suffering three stokes in the previous two years. By the end he was paralyzed and completely mute. Beside him are his sister Anna Ilyinichna Yelizarova-Ulyanova and one of his doctors A. M. Kozhevnikov. The mental strains of leading a revolution, governing, and fighting a civil war aggravated the physical debilitation consequent to the wounds from the… Read More »